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Gender Inclusion Archives - Lead Inclusively

Takeaways from Mckinsey's 2018 Women in the Workplace report

2018 McKinsey Report of Gender in the Workplace Showing More of the Same. Fed up yet? Me Too.

By | #bettertogether, #metoo to #wetoo, Diverity & Inclusion, Gender Inclusion | No Comments

Takeaways from Mckinsey’s 2018 Women in the Workplace report: In what is widely considered the primary barometer for the state of gender equity in the workforce, McKinsey’s annual report of gender parity in the workplace summarizes a stagnation in gender parity that is concerning but also raises some insight into potential solutions through inclusive culture transformation.

The report: pooling from 279 companies employing more than 13 million people, and features data compiled from their organizations. Like past reports, we notice a continuing trend of women being under-represented in the workforce and continually squeezed out of the workplace as they move higher up the corporate ladder. Women still make up the majority of college grads and leave the workforce at the same rate as men, highlighting that another year has gone by with seemingly the same dynamics at play that continue to hold women back and thus perpetuate the bigger issue of gender parity as a whole. Tired of watching another year go by with the same story unfolding? ME TOO.

Here are a few takeaways:

  • The root of the problem is culture.
  • Inclusion is the key to sustainable change
  • Leadership is the catalyst

The root of the problem is culture.   

While the still-prevalent accounts of sexual harassment are concerning, appalling and worthy of mention, for the sake of this article, I would like to discuss the phenomenon of microaggressions and the “only” experience that highlight the nuanced complexities of the cultural roots behind gender workplace inequality. Being the “Only” woman in a room is an occurrence experienced by one in five professional women and results in the higher likelihood of a woman experiencing, microaggressions, disengagement or worse, sexual harassment. Microaggressions can be described as experiencing a demeaning comment, having to provide more evidence of one’s competence, or being mistaken for someone much more junior. These experiences are products of a workplace culture that fosters an environment that perpetuates the exclusion of female workers throughout their professional life cycle.

Inclusion is the key to sustainable change 

Women are far more likely to experience microaggressions than men. This is only augmented by women who are “Onlys” and all the above result in women being forced out of the workforce pipeline through blatant exclusion in the form of lower promotion rates, or indirectly in the form of attrition because of disengagement. As a result, the issue of female under-representation and exclusion becomes a compounded snowballing effect. Inclusion needs to be the key to changing the focus of our current corporate workplace culture. Through training, gender advocacy and a general shift in workplace values, we can create a workplace that invites, empowers and advances female talent while decreasing the tolerance of, and likelihood for microaggressions, being an “Only” and overall female exclusion.

Leadership is the catalyst  

Leadership is the catalyst for instilling and enforcing an inclusive culture. Buy-in for inclusion and intolerance for exclusion must come from the top and perpetuate all the way down to the entry-level. Leadership is also the key component to fostering inclusion through engagement and advancement. Currently, women are less likely to see their work featured by their managers (at every stage of the employee life cycle) and are far less likely gain valuable access to senior leadership both of which are primary factors in an employee’s ability to advance within a company, and subsequently not leave. Under an umbrella of inclusion, leadership practices are the catalyst for the culture change the current corporate workforce needs if it is to achieve the gender equity that is not only fair but extremely necessary and overdue.

Takeaways from Mckinsey's 2018 Women in the Workplace report

Leaders need to take the lead when it comes to pioneering future gender equity efforts

Women are excluded through workplace culture that perpetuates inequality and is either purposefully, or inadvertently, upheld by workplace leadership figures from the management level all the way to the C-suite levels. The opportunity for change is there and the rewards for change are prevalent. The Question is: who will be the ones to seize it?

How is Lead Inclusively working to change and leverage personnel in leadership to the benefit of desired D&I transformation?

Leadership and culture are complex, yet vital, components necessary to effectively harness inclusion to the benefit of company innovation and productivity. Increasingly, larger companies are losing out on top talent, and subsequent innovation, to more agile companies who are more flexible and capable of implementing culture change when needed. See some ways how larger, less agile, companies are effectively delivering key learning and culture change at scale.

Also feel free to find us on LinkedIn and Facebook. We are a small team but we always find time to share content that is relevant to the most important D&I topics, and valuable towards inspiring dialogue to guide us all towards viable solutions. We ultimately are all Champions of Change and proponents of equity to all (Women and Men alike). Every interaction we can all share together is one more valuable step towards action and tangible change that makes our world fair and equitable for all.

 

Creating (and Winning!) the Case For Change: Webinar Presented by National Diversity Council

By | #metoo to #wetoo, Gender Inclusion, News and Events, Uncategorized | No Comments
Register Now

Do you ever wonder how you could better articulate the case for diversity and inclusion in your company? Creating the case for change can be a challenge, but with a few simple strategies, you can position D&I as a strategic value driver in a way that will be impossible to ignore.

Creating (and Winning!) the Case for Change is part three in the four-part diversity and inclusion webinar series “Champions of Change,” taught by Denise Pirrotti Hummel, J.D. and presented by the National Diversity Council.

Join us on September 18 for a complimentary webinar that can jumpstart a fledgling D&I program or invigorate a more mature D&I strategy. Hear global thought leader Denise Pirrotti Hummel, J.D., as she shares her expertise on creating allies, building buy-in, becoming an agent for change in your organization, and connecting diversity and inclusion with real business ROI.

You will learn:
• Your role as a change agent in your organization
• Identifying the most compelling case for change for your organization
• Tools for creating buy in
• How to connect the case for change to the strategic business plan

When: September 18, 2018
Time: 8am – 9:30am PST

Denise Hummel

About Denise Hummel:
Denise Pirrotti Hummel, J.D., is the Chief Innovation Officer of Lead Inclusively, Inc., a firm devoted to helping Life Sciences clients to make the connection between inclusion and business performance. She spent many years litigating Civil Rights Cases, including gender equality litigation. As a recovering lawyer, Ms. Hummel was the founder and CEO of a cross-cultural strategy firm which she grew as a single mother. The firm, Universal Consensus, LLC., was acquired by Ernst & Young, LLP., where Ms. Hummel became a partner and led their Talent, Inclusion and Innovation division. She then exited to start her second business.

She is now the Chief Innovation Officer of Lead Inclusively, Inc., a firm devoted to the connection between inclusion and business performance. She serves clients around the globe, with a strong presence in Life Sciences and High Tech. She is a Board Member of the HBA and the Co-Chair of the Life Sciences Committee of Athena. She is also a legacy member of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches team. Learn more about Lead Inclusively.

About the National Diversity Council and the National Training Center:
A well-informed and properly educated diverse and inclusive workforce can strengthen an organization’s reputation, financial performance, and workplace culture. The National Training Center is a customizable and convenient educational resource provided by the National Diversity Council, a nonprofit that champions diversity and inclusion in our communities and workplaces.

Register Now

Women on Boards: Tips From Debra Reed, CEO, Sempra Energy

By | #mentorher, #sponsorher, Diverity & Inclusion, Gender Inclusion, Inclusive Leadership, News and Events

On November 17th, I attended the 2020 Women on Boards Luncheon at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center in Los Angeles. I was fortunate to sit next to Debra Reed, CEO of Sempra Energy and the keynote speaker for the luncheon.

When Debra took the podium, her key message was to be optimistic, while also being realistic. “There are no glass ceilings if you do not believe that there are,” Reed said. “Be realistic about your board goals; start with a non-profit or a start-up before being wedded to aspirations of being on a Fortune 500 Board.”

Debra’s other tips were as follows:

1. Be the very best at what you do best.
2. Reach out to your network about your board aspirations with great specificity.
3. Be a team player at all times; this quality is not dispensable when working on a board.

Debra concluded by sharing her philosophy that leadership is not about knowing; it’s about how we learn. Our analytical ability is critical, but will only take us so far without a well-honed EQ. And since that EQ-IQ combination is what we do best as woman, we should be in good shape to move above the 19% of board positions we currently hold.

As a member of Marshall Goldsmith’s legacy team of executive coaches (the MG100), I am a firm believer that stakeholder-centered leadership coaching can assist women in becoming more well-rounded candidates for board positions. Lead Inclusively is committed to providing the coaching that can assist women in their journeys to the top. Learn more about our executive coaching services here.

News: Saatchi Chairman Has Resigned Following His Controversial Gender Diversity Remarks

By | #bettertogether, #metoo to #wetoo, Gender Inclusion, Uncategorized

 

Kevin Roberts was recently quoted as stating about women professionals, “Their ambition is not a vertical ambition, it’s this intrinsic, circular ambition to be happy. So they say: ‘We are not judging ourselves by those standards that you idiotic dinosaur-like men judge yourself by.’”

Without judgment about the prudence of his statements (which history will record as resulting in his resignation) or the factual truth (neuroscience has clearly demonstrated the incongruencies of his statements regarding the way women think), we must examine both the maturity model of the organizational, national, gender and generational issues associated with the gender “debate.”

Beyond that — Roberts’ quote is so telling about the lack of preparedness of senior executives to effectively address this issue publicly in a way that  puts the company represented in the best possible light regarding gender parity awareness.  The statistics, from the World Economic Forum to every major global consulting firm in the world support the fact that without a shift towards inclusive leadership, teaming, organizational policies and global community, that we will not reach gender parity for the better part of a century.

Most of us, men and women, if we are mentally and emotionally healthy, have the ambition to be happy.  In terms of vertical ambition, some of us, men and women, may wish to rise to senior leadership for increased money, power, and status.  The rest of us, men and women, want to rise to senior leadership so that we can assist our organizations, our people, and our mission to achieve through our thought-leadership, loyalty, and commitment to what our organizations stand for in the global economy and global community.  The defining factor around this is not a gender issue, but rather an issue of individual ethos and personal mission of what we stand for as people and professionals on this earth. Together we can become champions of change for gender parity in the workplace.

Learn more about developing Champions of Change with our one-day workshop.