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Diversity and inclusion training Archives - Lead Inclusively

Takeaways from Mckinsey's 2018 Women in the Workplace report

Mckinsey Women in the Workplace 2018 Report Showing More of the Same. Fed up yet? Me Too.

By | Diverity & Inclusion, Gender Inclusion, Gender Parity, News and Events | No Comments

In response to the 2018 Mckinsey Women in the Workplace Report: In what is widely considered the primary barometer for the state of gender equity in the workforce, McKinsey’s annual report of gender parity in the workplace summarizes a stagnation in gender parity that is concerning but also raises some insight into potential solutions through inclusive culture transformation.

The report: pooling from 279 companies employing more than 13 million people, and features data compiled from their organizations. Like past reports, we notice a continuing trend of women being under-represented in the workforce and continually squeezed out of the workplace as they move higher up the corporate ladder. Women still make up the majority of college grads and leave the workforce at the same rate as men, highlighting that another year has gone by with seemingly the same dynamics at play that continue to hold women back and thus perpetuate the bigger issue of gender parity as a whole. Tired of watching another year go by with the same story unfolding? ME TOO.

Here are a few takeaways:

  • The root of the problem is culture.
  • Inclusion is the key to sustainable change
  • Leadership is the catalyst

The root of the problem is culture.   

While the still-prevalent accounts of sexual harassment are concerning, appalling and worthy of mention, for the sake of this article, I would like to discuss the phenomenon of microaggressions and the “only” experience that highlight the nuanced complexities of the cultural roots behind gender workplace inequality. Being the “Only” woman in a room is an occurrence experienced by one in five professional women and results in the higher likelihood of a woman experiencing, microaggressions, disengagement or worse, sexual harassment. Microaggressions can be described as experiencing a demeaning comment, having to provide more evidence of one’s competence, or being mistaken for someone much more junior. These experiences are products of a workplace culture that fosters an environment that perpetuates the exclusion of female workers throughout their professional life cycle.

Inclusion is the key to sustainable change 

Women are far more likely to experience microaggressions than men. This is only augmented by women who are “Onlys” and all the above result in women being forced out of the workforce pipeline through blatant exclusion in the form of lower promotion rates, or indirectly in the form of attrition because of disengagement. As a result, the issue of female under-representation and exclusion becomes a compounded snowballing effect. Inclusion needs to be the key to changing the focus of our current corporate workplace culture. Through training, gender advocacy and a general shift in workplace values, we can create a workplace that invites, empowers and advances female talent while decreasing the tolerance of, and likelihood for microaggressions, being an “Only” and overall female exclusion.

Leadership is the catalyst  

Leadership is the catalyst for instilling and enforcing an inclusive culture. Buy-in for inclusion and intolerance for exclusion must come from the top and perpetuate all the way down to the entry-level. Leadership is also the key component to fostering inclusion through engagement and advancement. Currently, women are less likely to see their work featured by their managers (at every stage of the employee life cycle) and are far less likely gain valuable access to senior leadership both of which are primary factors in an employee’s ability to advance within a company, and subsequently not leave. Under an umbrella of inclusion, leadership practices are the catalyst for the culture change the current corporate workforce needs if it is to achieve the gender equity that is not only fair but extremely necessary and overdue.

women in leadership mckinsey stats

Women are excluded through a workplace culture that perpetuates inequality and is either purposefully, or inadvertently, upheld by workplace leadership figures from the management level all the way to the C-suite levels. The opportunity for change is there and the rewards for change are prevalent. The question is: who will be the ones to seize it?

How is Lead Inclusively working to change and leverage personnel in leadership to the benefit of desired D&I transformation?

Leadership and culture are complex, yet vital, components necessary to effectively harness inclusion to the benefit of company innovation and productivity. Increasingly, larger companies are losing out on top talent, and subsequent innovation, to more agile companies who are more flexible and capable of implementing culture change when needed. See some ways how larger, less agile, companies are effectively delivering key learning and culture change at scale.

Also, feel free to find us on LinkedIn and Facebook. We are a small team but we always find time to share content that is relevant to the most important D&I topics, and valuable towards inspiring dialogue to guide us all towards viable solutions. We ultimately are all Champions of Change and proponents of equity to all (Women and Men alike). Every interaction we can all share together is one more valuable step towards action and tangible change that makes our world fair and equitable for all.

 

Diversity Metrics that matter - Lead Inclusively

Diversity Metrics That Matter: Webinar Presented by NDC

By | Diverity & Inclusion, Gender Inclusion, Human Resources, News and Events | No Comments
See the Recording

Metrics That Matter is part two in the four-part diversity and inclusion webinar series “Champions of Change,” taught by Denise Pirrotti Hummel, J.D. Presented by the National Diversity Council.

Although nearly all companies believe that diversity and inclusion are critical to business success, only 85% of companies track any kind of diversity and inclusion metric. Unfortunately, there is often a lack of knowledge around which metrics matter most. This creates an opportunity for companies who do use metrics to be able to reach their full potential. Lead Inclusively assists organizations in using D&I metrics to diagnose and correct issues throughout the talent pipeline, contribute to business goals, optimize processes and effect sustainable change. Join us on June 5th for a free webinar. Hear global thought leader Denise Pirrotti Hummel, J.D., as she shares her expertise on connecting diversity and inclusion with business ROI. Attend this can’t miss webinar to get your company’s D&I strategy moving in the right direction.

You will learn:
– The value of metrics for tracking and creating sustainable change
– Meaningful metrics most companies aren’t tracking
– Which metrics to track across the employee lifecycle and how to get started
– How to use metrics to optimize processes and achieve strategic D&I goals
– Best and next practices in tracking metrics that matter

When: June 5, 2018
Time: 8am – 9:30am PST

Denise Hummel CEO Lead Inclusively

Denise Hummel

About Denise Hummel:
Denise Pirrotti Hummel, J.D., is the Chief Innovation Officer of Lead Inclusively, Inc., a firm devoted to helping Life Sciences clients to make the connection between inclusion and business performance. She spent many years litigating Civil Rights Cases, including gender equality litigation. As a recovering lawyer, Ms. Hummel was the founder and CEO of a cross-cultural strategy firm which she grew as a single mother. The firm, Universal Consensus, LLC., was acquired by Ernst & Young, LLP., where Ms. Hummel became a partner and led their Talent, Inclusion and Innovation division. She then exited to start her second business.

She is now the Chief Innovation Officer of Lead Inclusively, Inc., a firm devoted to the connection between inclusion and business performance. She serves clients around the globe, with a strong presence in Life Sciences and High Tech. She is a Board Member of the HBA and the Co-Chair of the Life Sciences Committee of Athena. She is also a legacy member of Marshall Goldsmith’s 100 Coaches team. Learn more about Lead Inclusively.

About the National Diversity Council and the National Training Center:
A well-informed and properly educated diverse and inclusive workforce can strengthen an organization’s reputation, financial performance, and workplace culture. The National Training Center is a customizable and convenient educational resource provided by the National Diversity Council, a nonprofit that champions diversity and inclusion in our communities and workplaces.

 

See the Recording

Life Sciences Fireside Chat Program Recap

By | #bettertogether, Gender Inclusion, News and Events

Blog recap of Athena Life Sciences Special Interest Group program: Fireside Chat with notable women in science.

Linda Strause, PhD and Sara Gilman, LMFT met because they both enjoy cycling.  They became close friends because, in addition to cycling, they shared a philosophy that life’s challenges could create such deviations from the most direct route to success, that navigating without a map might actually make more sense.

As a scholar of leadership, I often hear inspirational stories about how professionals achieved success.  This is the first time, however, that I have heard a story of the syncopation of two leaders whose paths have intersected with such serendipity, despite the fact that both walked (or rather cycled) their journey without a map and that their respective compasses were not always tracking true north.

Linda, the Principal and Founder of Strategic Clinical Consultants, shared with us that as she was working tirelessly in the field of oncology, her husband was diagnosed with brain cancer.  Sara, the Founder & President of Coherence Associates, Inc.,  shared with us that while she was working zealously as a family therapist to help others to battle addiction, she came to understand that her own son was experiencing his own battle with addiction.  Powerhouses in their own right, each was powerless to “fix” a problem in their own families, related to their respective expertise.  Their work, their cycling, their friendship and their family life worked in unison to help them heal, as well as stay focused on success, as the gentle sway of the road turned at times to hairpin curves.

The sons of both women eventually joined them in their “Mom-Owned Businesses,” and each credits her son with having insight into the business complementary to her own set of skills.

The definition of success varies with the individual.  It would be easy to define both women as a success.  Linda Strause has thirty years of experience in global clinical operations and clinical development in oncology.  Sara Gilman has created a company consisting of a team of counselors and family therapists.  As Sara explained a breathing technique that is used to reinforce the heart’s regulation of emotional response to create mental toughness, Linda ended the Athena session with a quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson, “To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.”  I might add that to thrive in business, while simultaneously administering to the needs of loved ones, takes great courage.  It would be easy to forsake one for the other, and the extremes of selfishness or selflessness are far more common than the balance between them.

Get more innovative! To augment your own life sciences organization, take a moment to learn more about about our Life Sciences Innovation Labs.

By Denise Hummel, Founder & Chief Innovation Officer, Lead Inclusively, Inc.

 

Women on Boards: Tips From Debra Reed, CEO, Sempra Energy

By | #mentorher, #sponsorher, Diverity & Inclusion, Gender Inclusion, Inclusive Leadership, News and Events

On November 17th, I attended the 2020 Women on Boards Luncheon at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center in Los Angeles. I was fortunate to sit next to Debra Reed, CEO of Sempra Energy and the keynote speaker for the luncheon.

When Debra took the podium, her key message was to be optimistic, while also being realistic. “There are no glass ceilings if you do not believe that there are,” Reed said. “Be realistic about your board goals; start with a non-profit or a start-up before being wedded to aspirations of being on a Fortune 500 Board.”

Debra’s other tips were as follows:

1. Be the very best at what you do best.
2. Reach out to your network about your board aspirations with great specificity.
3. Be a team player at all times; this quality is not dispensable when working on a board.

Debra concluded by sharing her philosophy that leadership is not about knowing; it’s about how we learn. Our analytical ability is critical, but will only take us so far without a well-honed EQ. And since that EQ-IQ combination is what we do best as woman, we should be in good shape to move above the 19% of board positions we currently hold.

As a member of Marshall Goldsmith’s legacy team of executive coaches (the MG100), I am a firm believer that stakeholder-centered leadership coaching can assist women in becoming more well-rounded candidates for board positions. Lead Inclusively is committed to providing the coaching that can assist women in their journeys to the top. Learn more about our executive coaching services here.

3 Behaviors That Accelerate Innovation

By | Diverity & Inclusion, Inclusive Innovation, Inclusive Leadership

To succeed, leaders of diverse organizations must create an inclusive environment that encourages new ideas.

Many studies show that organizations with a diverse workforce out-perform more homogenous organizations. According to McKinsey’s 2015 study “Diversity Matters,” companies in the top quartile for gender or racial and ethnic diversity are more likely to have financial returns above their national industry medians. Companies in the bottom quartile in these dimensions are statistically less likely to achieve above-average returns.

While greater gender and ethnic diversity in corporate leadership doesn’t automatically translate into more profit, the correlation does indicate that when companies commit themselves to diverse leadership, they can be more successful.

What makes diverse organizations perform well, however, is not just the number of women and minorities they employ. It’s about how included these diverse individuals are in key decision-making activities and how organizations value their contributions. It’s also to what extent they rise to senior leadership so that their voices are more likely to translate into meaningful organizational transformation and provide inspiration to others in the diversity talent pipeline.

According to a 2013 Corporate Executive Board and Center for Talent Innovation study, the “inclusion” part of the “diversity and inclusion” equation is a key enabling or limiting factor. Inclusive leadership behaviors unlock the innovative potential of a diverse workforce and increase the likelihood (by as much as 158%) of innovating effectively.

Organizational leaders must ask themselves if they provide an environment that encourages diverse people to express their ideas so that the motivation to share diverse ideation thrives. When individuals on a team feel that their opinions are valuable and sought-after by their leader, they allow themselves the luxury and the discipline of sharing ideas without creating a self-induced filter regarding ideas that aren’t in sync with prevailing thought or the historic ways of doing things.

In the absence of inclusive leadership, employees will often do the minimum necessary to achieve their own individual performance goals, rather than see themselves as instrumental to organizational performance and growth.

So how should organizational leaders practice inclusion?

The three “Rs” of inclusive leadership provide a framework to move the needle on the connection between inclusion and innovation:

1. Receptive: Seek out opinions and viewpoints on a regular basis.
Most leaders consider themselves receptive. The reality is that if we do not seek out diverse opinions on a regular basis and make that part of the structure of our meetings—as well as the way our team is evaluated—then our self-perception does not always align with the reality of our day-to-day team interaction.

Encourage sharing different opinions and viewpoints during team meetings by incorporating the concept into every team agenda. Incorporate formal KPIs or performance goals that reflect the importance, accountability, and appreciation related to new ideas about products, services, and internal process. Consider using interactive technology such as gamification to challenge the team to share ideas. In the absence of direct and discernible goals, “groupthink” and reliance on the historical way of doing things will be the norm.

If team members know that their performance evaluation will be, in part, dependent upon their contribution, even in the face of a less than popular point of view, the chance of hearing diverse ideation increases dramatically.

2. Reflective: Keep decision-making honest and transparent.
When an idea offered by a team member is not acted upon, or a decision is made that could result in the appearance that a certain team member is being favored over others, inclusive leaders explain the “why” of their decision to their team, honestly and transparently. Nature abhors a vacuum. In the absence of direct information about why a decision is made, team members are left to speculate about the “why” and will freely attribute a decision to cronyism, or to the fact that the person chosen happens to share the same viewpoint as the leader.

In the age of technology, the final decisions are often transmitted virtually and announced by email or newsletter, leaving a team without personal interaction with their leader regarding the nuances of the decision. If all factors have been included, especially those related to diverse thought that goes against the mainstream, then call that out before the decision is announced. If not, then reconsider the basis of the decision before announcing it.

3. Revitalizing: Listen for the silence.
Find ways for the quieter voices in the team to be heard. Look around the room. When is the last time you heard each team member’s voice? Are there some team members who manage to be heard, no matter what? Are there some that seem to have nothing to say?

Assuming that your organization chooses its talent carefully, the chances are pretty good that silence does not mean that there is no point of view. Rather, it may be a personality or cultural style that does not easily permit contribution without that voice actively being requested. Ask, “Is there anything you’d like to share about this subject?”

For especially shy or introverted team members, consider giving them advanced notice that you’d like to hear from them at the next team meeting. You may be amazed.

The Outcome of Inclusion
While every organization is different, small changes in inclusivity seem to have exponential results. For example, I recently challenged a client to take one singular action in each of the categories above and to survey the outcome, including asking an open-ended question relative to how team members felt about the changes that were instituted.

One of the actions they took was that a cloud-based receptacle for ideas was established. Entries were coded in such a way that ideas could remain anonymous or could be revealed by the idea donor. Team members could anonymously vote and they could also comment or clarify an idea. A gamification component was added whereby digital badges could be collected. When a certain number of badges were obtained (regardless of the identity of the donors), the team was rewarded with a team dinner, courtesy of the company.

In addition to the fact that many process optimizations took place and several new service ideas moved forward to be vetted, the overwhelming majority of the comments reflected a feeling of excitement, optimism, and engagement, including one team member who exclaimed, “Can we please shut down the portal over the weekend? My husband is getting really annoyed because I keep getting up in the middle of the day to input an idea that I dreamt about that night!” To which the team leader responded, “All our teams should all have such problems!”

Originally published in Oracle Profit Magazine.

Reap the benefits of Inclusive Leadership company-wide – explore our full-day Inclusive Leadership workshops.

News: Syracuse University Students Protest Drop in Diversity

By | Diverity & Inclusion, News and Events, Racial Inclusion

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Syracuse University is taking steps to address a 4 percent decrease in the number of students of color who enrolled this year.

The class of 2020, whose approximately 4,000 members started their first day of classes this week, is made up of 24 percent students of color, according to SU. That’s down from 28 percent last year.

The decrease comes after two years of debate on campus about whether diversity is a priority. The campus was rocked two years ago when a video surfaced online of a women’s soccer player using homophobic and racial slurs.

Student advocates and the group THE General Body have held protests and raised concerns about diversity on campus, mostly in the 2014-15 school year. One of the protestors told a Syracuse.com reporter that students of color “feel like the campus isn’t built for us.”

Chancellor Kent Syverud came under fire that year after funding cuts were made to programs students said were primarily used by racial minorities.

Source: http://blog.syracuse.com/sports/2014/09/syracuse_womens_soccer_player_hanna_strong_suspended_after_using_slurs_in_video.html

Trends: Keep an Eye on Diverse Micro-Markets

By | Diverity & Inclusion, News and Events, Racial Inclusion

Black consumers are an underestimated force in the American economy, but not for long.

A new Nielsen report on “the untold story” of black consumers, shows that as the black population grows, so will its economic influence and buying power.

The report highlights 2015 as a “tipping point” for black Americans in their “unprecedented impact” across a number of areas, especially television, music, social media and on social issues. Demographic trends combined with the power of social media have collided to empower an increasingly educated, affluent, and tech-savvy black consumer base. As a result, it’s a key time for companies to “build and sustain deeper, more meaningful connections” with black consumers, according to the findings.

Sources:

http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2014/connecting-through-culture-african-americans-favor-diverse-advertising.html
http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/02/black-consumers-have-unprecedented-impact-in-2015/433725/

Trends: Emmy Awards Diversity Boom Reflects the Times

By | #bettertogether, Diverity & Inclusion, News and Events, Racial Inclusion

Now we’re talking!

Among the milestones this year are Kenya Barris becoming the first solo African-American series creator to be nominated for comedy series, as well as Aziz Ansari and Alan Yang of Netflix’s “Master of None” becoming the first Indian-American and Asian-American series creators to land a comedy series nomination. John Singleton, a director of FX’s “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” became the first black helmer to be nominated for an Oscar and an Emmy.

Emmy Awards’ Diversity Boom Reflects America

Speak Milk. Drink Wine. (Becoming a Global Citizen)

By | Cross-Cultural, News and Events

My new book, “Speak Milk. Drink Wine.” is now available here! Thrilled with the great reviews I’m receiving after having spent so much time and effort on this labor of love. Cross cultural integration is a huge passion of mine and I’m very happy to share my experiences with the world.

As part of the launch, I very much enjoyed being interviewed by James Lott Jr. for Book Circle Online. He’s so engaging and light-hearted, as you’ll see below.

Also explore information on critical global mindset trainingfor your company.

Trends: San Diego Stats on Women & Veterans

By | Diverity & Inclusion, News and Events

The San Diego Business Journal yesterday reported as follows:

The San Diego area workforce has the highest percentage of millennials and veterans but the lowest percentage of women compared to nine competing metro areas.

That’s according to information compiled by the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, via its foundation, as part of its Regional Jobs Strategy launched earlier this year.

The data, called the chamber’s Business and Tax Climate Dashboard, compares San Diego to the metropolitan areas of Austin, Boston, Denver, Los Angeles, Portland, Raleigh, San Francisco, San Jose and Seattle.

“Making San Diego a place where business can succeed and grow means we have to identify our strengths as well as our weaknesses,” said Jerry Sanders, chamber president and CEO, in a statement Thursday.

Of San Diego’s workforce, 28.8 percent were born in 1980 through 1998, more than all the other areas to which it was compared. A total of 7.3 percent of the workforce is made up of veterans, handily beating the metro average of 4.4 percent.

However, likely as a result of the high percentage of veterans in the workforce, a group made up mostly by men, San Diego has the lowest percentage of women in its workforce: 44 percent. The metro average of those areas studied is 46.2 percent.

However, 46.2 percent of businesses in San Diego are owned by women, the data show. Eleven percent are owned by veterans, the dashboard revealed.

“With large millennial and veteran populations in our workforce, we see that we have new talent to build on as well as a highly trained contingent of workers, but we also need to do more to raise the number of women and minorities in our workforce,” said Helen Robbins-Meyer, the county of San Diego’s chief administrative officer. “Having this data as a point of reference is important to building an effective job creation strategy for the region.”

According to the chamber’s dashboard, San Diego ranks eighth in education attainment but fourth for STEM and STEM-related majors; fourth in workplace diversity; seventh for highest median wage at $19.12 hourly; and sixth for its 8 percent sales tax on a ranking of the areas with the highest such rate.

Women in executive positions at corporate organizations are still underrepresented. Check out the Lead Inclusively Champions of Change workshop to see how your company can promote and equip women and men to partner for workforce equality.